What is a diabetic medical emergency?

Diabetes is a long-term medical condition where the body cannot produce enough insulin. Sometimes those who have diabetes may have a diabetic emergency, where their blood sugar level becomes too high or too low. Both conditions could be serious and may need treatment in hospital.

What is considered diabetic emergency?

Diabetic Ketoacidosis. Diabetic ketoacidosis, or DKA, is a life-threatening emergency caused when you don’t have enough insulin and your liver has to break down fat into ketones for energy, but too fast for the body to handle. A buildup of ketones can change your blood chemistry and poison you.

What are 5 signs of a diabetic emergency?

What are the signs and symptoms of a diabetic emergency?

  • hunger.
  • clammy skin.
  • profuse sweating.
  • drowsiness or confusion.
  • weakness or feeling faint.
  • sudden loss of responsiveness.

What is the most common diabetic emergency?

A diabetic coma is a life-threatening diabetes complication that causes unconsciousness. If you have diabetes, dangerously high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) or dangerously low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) can lead to a diabetic coma.

What causes a diabetic emergency?

A diabetic emergency is caused by an imbalance between sugar and insulin in the body. It can happen when there is: Too much sugar in the blood (hyperglycemia): Among other causes, the person may not have taken enough insulin or the person is reacting adversely to a large meal or a meal that is high in carbohydrates.

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What are 3 signs of a diabetic emergency?

The warning signs include:

  • feeling thirsty or having a dry mouth.
  • frequent urination.
  • fatigue.
  • dry or flushed skin.
  • nausea, vomiting, or abdominal pain.
  • difficulty focusing.
  • confusion.
  • difficulty breathing.

At what sugar level is diabetic coma?

A diabetic coma could happen when your blood sugar gets too high — 600 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) or more — causing you to become very dehydrated. It usually affects people with type 2 diabetes that isn’t well-controlled.

When should I call 911 for high blood sugar?

For adults, if you start to feel drowsy or disoriented or if your blood sugar continues to rise, for example, above 20.0 mmol/L, call 911 or other emergency services immediately. It’s best to have someone with you if your blood sugar is this elevated so that the person can call for you.

When should a diabetic go to hospital?

You should call your doctor if you have high blood sugar levels throughout the day, if you find your blood sugar level is always high at the same time each day, or if you are having symptoms of high blood sugar like drinking or urinating (peeing) a lot more than normal.

How can I lower my blood sugar instantly in an emergency?

When your blood sugar level gets too high — known as hyperglycemia or high blood glucose — the quickest way to reduce it is to take fast-acting insulin. Exercising is another fast, effective way to lower blood sugar. In some cases, you should go to the hospital instead of handling it at home.

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How is hypoglycemia treated in emergency?

Immediate treatment

  1. Eat or drink 15 to 20 grams of fast-acting carbohydrates. These are sugary foods without protein or fat that are easily converted to sugar in the body. …
  2. Recheck blood sugar levels 15 minutes after treatment. …
  3. Have a snack or meal.

How is a diabetic emergency treated?

Emergency treatment can lower your blood sugar to a normal range. Treatment usually includes: Fluid replacement. You’ll receive fluids — usually through a vein (intravenously) — until you’re rehydrated.

How long does a diabetic coma last?

If it progresses and worsens without treatment it can eventually cause unconsciousness, from a combination of a very high blood sugar level, dehydration and shock, and exhaustion. Coma only occurs at an advanced stage, usually after 36 hours or more of worsening vomiting and hyperventilation.