Which factors pose a risk for the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus select all that apply?

What are the risk factors for developing type 2 diabetes?

Factors that may increase your risk of type 2 diabetes include:

  • Weight. Being overweight or obese is a main risk.
  • Fat distribution. Storing fat mainly in your abdomen — rather than your hips and thighs — indicates a greater risk. …
  • Inactivity. …
  • Family history. …
  • Race and ethnicity. …
  • Blood lipid levels. …
  • Age. …
  • Prediabetes.

What is the most common contributing factor to the development of Type II diabetes group of answer choices?

Type 2 diabetes has several causes: genetics and lifestyle are the most important ones. A combination of these factors can cause insulin resistance, when your body doesn’t use insulin as well as it should. Insulin resistance is the most common cause of type 2 diabetes.

What are examples of risk factors?

Risk factor examples

  • Negative attitudes, values or beliefs.
  • Low self-esteem.
  • Drug, alcohol or solvent abuse.
  • Poverty.
  • Children of parents in conflict with the law.
  • Homelessness.
  • Presence of neighbourhood crime.
  • Early and repeated anti-social behaviour.
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Is gender a risk factor for type 2 diabetes?

Men are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes. Women are more likely to experience complications, including heart and kidney disease. The effects of high blood sugar and reduced hormone signaling can also impact sexual health in both men and women.

What are some risk factors for type 1 diabetes?

Risk factors for type 1 diabetes

  • Family history. Your risk increases if a parent or sibling has type 1 diabetes.
  • Environmental factors. Circumstances such as exposure to a viral illness likely play some role in type 1 diabetes.
  • The presence of damaging immune system cells (autoantibodies). …
  • Geography.

What are the risk factors for developing gestational diabetes?

Risk factors for gestational diabetes include the following:

  • Overweight and obesity.
  • A lack of physical activity.
  • Previous gestational diabetes or prediabetes.
  • Polycystic ovary syndrome.
  • Diabetes in an immediate family member.
  • Previously delivering a baby weighing more than 9 pounds (4.1 kilograms).

What is the single greatest risk factor for type 1 diabetes mellitus that this patient has?

The main risk factors for type 1 diabetes include : Family history: Having a parent or sibling with type 1 diabetes increases the risk of a person having the same type. If both parents have type 1 diabetes, the risk is even higher. Age: Type 1 diabetes usually develops in younger adults and children.

What is a developmental risk factors?

Key risk factors known to affect child development may be broadly grouped into those affecting (1) the wider community and environment in which the child and family live, often termed the social determinants of health [2] (poverty, lack of access to education, environmental stressors, poor water and sanitation); (2) …

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What are the 4 types of risk factors?

3.2 Identification and Classification of Health Risk Factors in Built Environments and Their Parameters

  • Biological risk factors,
  • Chemical risk factors,
  • Physical risk factors, and.
  • Psychosocial, personal and other risk factors.

What are the 3 risk factors?

These are called risk factors. About half of all Americans (47%) have at least 1 of 3 key risk factors for heart disease: high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and smoking. Some risk factors for heart disease cannot be controlled, such as your age or family history.

How is type 2 diabetes prevented?

13 Ways to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

  1. Cut Sugar and Refined Carbs From Your Diet. …
  2. Work Out Regularly. …
  3. Drink Water as Your Primary Beverage. …
  4. Lose Weight If You’re Overweight or Obese. …
  5. Quit Smoking. …
  6. Follow a Very-Low-Carb Diet. …
  7. Watch Portion Sizes. …
  8. Avoid Sedentary Behaviors.