What are diabetic services?

Providing specialist care for people with type 2 diabetes, and some with type 1, to help them self-manage their condition.

What are support services for diabetes?

Support Groups running across NSW and the ACT

  • Central Coast – Toukley Diabetes Support Group. …
  • Port Macquarie – JK Healthcare Diabetes Support Group. …
  • Central NSW – Forbes Support Group. …
  • Southern Sydney – Engadine Diabetic Support Group. …
  • Hunter – Lake Macquarie Diabetic Group. …
  • Southern NSW – Albury Wodonga Support Group.

What does a diabetic clinic do?

Diabetes clinics give you the chance to meet medical experts who can check that you’re as healthy as possible and give you highly specialised advice on how to look after your diabetes.

What services does diabetes Victoria provide?

Diabetes Victoria is a membership-based organisation that provides diabetes education, awareness activities and research assistance covering type 1, type 2 and gestational diabetes for people living with and/or at risk of diabetes, their families, carers and health professionals.

What is a diabetes care team?

Besides you, diabetes care team members will usually include a diabetes care provider, which may be a physician, nurse-practitioner, and/or a physician’s assistant; your diabetes educators, such as a registered nurse, a registered dietitian, and/or a registered pharmacist; and, in many cases, a mental health …

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Who can help with diabetes management?

An endocrinologist is a medical specialist who can provide expert advice on the management of diabetes. They know how to treat conditions that are often complex and involve many systems within your body. You need a referral from your doctor to see an endocrinologist.

What is diabetes doctor called?

Endocrinologist. An endocrinologist is a doctor who has special training and experience in treating people with diabetes.

What levels are checked for diabetes?

A blood sample will be taken after an overnight fast. A fasting blood sugar level less than 100 mg/dL (5.6 mmol/L) is normal. A fasting blood sugar level from 100 to 125 mg/dL (5.6 to 6.9 mmol/L) is considered prediabetes. If it’s 126 mg/dL (7 mmol/L) or higher on two separate tests, you have diabetes.

What is worse type 1 or 2 diabetes?

Type 2 diabetes is often milder than type 1. But it can still cause major health complications, especially in the tiny blood vessels in your kidneys, nerves, and eyes. Type 2 also raises your risk of heart disease and stroke.

What blood tests should a diabetic have?

Your doctor will have you take one or more of the following blood tests to confirm the diagnosis:

  • A1C Test. The A1C test measures your average blood sugar level over the past 2 or 3 months. …
  • Fasting Blood Sugar Test. …
  • Glucose Tolerance Test. …
  • Random Blood Sugar Test. …
  • Glucose Screening Test. …
  • Glucose Tolerance Test.

Is Diabetes Australia a government Organisation?

Each state and territory diabetes organisation is a non-government, community based organisation reliant upon community support.

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Why does untreated diabetes cause blindness?

New blood vessels can grow in the front part of your eye (iris) and interfere with the normal flow of fluid out of the eye, causing pressure in the eye to build. This pressure can damage the nerve that carries images from your eye to your brain (optic nerve). Blindness.

What are 3 complications of diabetes?

Possible complications include:

  • Cardiovascular disease. …
  • Nerve damage (neuropathy). …
  • Kidney damage (nephropathy). …
  • Eye damage (retinopathy). …
  • Foot damage. …
  • Skin conditions. …
  • Hearing impairment. …
  • Alzheimer’s disease.

What do diabetes specialist nurses do?

Diabetes Specialist Nurses (DSNs) are crucial in providing good patient care and promoting self-care management. DSNs work wholly in diabetes care and may be employed in a variety of care settings. A DSN is often the first point of contact for people, referring them to other specialist services.

What are therapeutic procedures for diabetes?

This includes monitoring blood glucose levels, dietary management, maintaining physical activity, keeping weight and stress under control, monitoring oral medications and, if required, insulin use via injections or pump.