Question: How do you cut old diabetic toenails?

Cut toenails after bathing, when they are soft. Trim them straight across, then smooth with a nail file. Avoid cutting into the corners of toes. Don’t let the corners of your toenails grow into the skin.

Why should you not cut a diabetics toenails?

Although a nice, rounded cut is often preferred over a square clipping, diabetics must be careful making curved clips. Cutting too far into the corners of your toenails can lead to the formation of ingrown nails, oftentimes leading to an infection.

Where do I cut my diabetic toenails?

Wash your hands and put on gloves to trim the toenails. Use your dominant hand to hold the nipper. Start with the small toe and work your way medial toward the great toe. Squeeze the nipper to make small nips to cut along the curve of the toenail.

What do diabetes toenails look like?

What to Look For in Diabetic Toenails. The first toenail change you’ll notice in diabetic patients is likely to be discoloration. Most have some yellowing of the nails, though the shade and involvement can vary. Discoloring may start at the distal edge (tip), and run all the way to the root of the nail bed.

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Can diabetics have their toenails removed?

Removing the toenail completely is not recommended for individuals who have diabetes, since the risk of complications due to poor wound healing and infection is high. I would highly recommend that you go to your doctor or a podiatrist to manage the trimming and, if necessary, the removal of the nail.

How do you cut old toenails?

Soak your feet in warm water for at least 10 minutes to soften your nails, and then use a towel to thoroughly dry your feet and toenails. Using a nail clipper, make small cuts to avoid splintering the nail and cut straight across. To lessen the chance of the nail becoming ingrown, don’t round off the corners.

Who can cut my toenails?

While you may be able to care for your toenails at home, you can also schedule a visit with the podiatrists at Certified Foot and Ankle Specialists to trim your toenails properly.

What happens if a diabetic gets a cut on their foot?

Cuts, scrapes, scratches, or blisters on your feet can become an ulcer. These deep, open wounds can allow bacteria into your bloodstream. You could become very ill or risk needing an amputation if you don’t seek care. It’s important to keep any infection controlled, before it gets into your system, Roth says.

What is the white stuff under my toenails?

Nail psoriasis sometimes causes too much keratin to grow under the nail. This overgrowth is called subungual hyperkeratosis. People with hyperkeratosis may notice a white, chalky substance under the nail. When this occurs in the toenails, the pressure of shoes pushing down on the nails might cause pain.

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Can a diabetic have a pedicure?

Diabetics are at risk of foot ulcers and even possible amputation. Taking excellent care of your feet is crucial. Diabetes Forecast says you can get a pedicure at a nail salon as long as you don’t have an infection cut ulcer or neuropathy — but urges you to use caution and good judgment.

Should diabetics wear socks to bed?

Consider socks made specifically for patients living with diabetes. These socks have extra cushioning, do not have elastic tops, are higher than the ankle and are made from fibers that wick moisture away from the skin. Wear socks to bed. If your feet get cold at night, wear socks.

How do you treat diabetic toenails?

Another option is to take an oral antifungal drug. Combining an oral drug with a topical one you rub on your nails may increase the chance of curing the infection. Terbinafine (Lamisil) and itraconazole (Sporanox) are both considered safe for people with diabetes.

Why do diabetics toenails get thick?

Diabetics often have reduced blood flow to their feet, which may cause thicker toenails or numbness. With psoriasis, the nail may lift away from the toe. Make sure you take good care of yourself to avoid complications of either diabetes or psoriasis.