Frequent question: WHAT ARE THE ABCs of diabetes management?

What are the ABC’s of diabetes management?

The American Diabetes Association and the American College of Cardiology have teamed up to raise public awareness of the “ABCs of diabetes,” namely A1C, blood pressure, and cholesterol. To have a good sense of your risk of cardiovascular disease and other diabetes complications, you need to “know your numbers.”

WHAT DOES THE ABCs stand for in diabetes?

The ABCs of diabetes stand for: A —the A1C test, which measures average blood sugar over 2 to 3 months. B —blood pressure, the force of blood flow inside blood vessels. C —cholesterol, a group of blood fats that affect the risk of heart attack or stroke. s —stop smoking or don’t start.

WHAT ARE THE ABCs of managing type 2 diabetes?

Type 2 diabetes management can be overwhelming, but understanding the basics of which numbers to pay attention can simplify it. The three numbers you should know are A1C, Blood pressure, and Cholesterol — otherwise known as the Diabetes ABCs.

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What is the best management of diabetes?

Metformin is generally the preferred initial medication for treating type 2 diabetes unless there’s a specific reason not to use it. Metformin is effective, safe, and inexpensive. It may reduce the risk of cardiovascular events. Metformin also has beneficial effects when it comes to reducing A1C results.

What is the A1C percentage goal for the average person with type 2 diabetes?

An A1c goal of between 7% and 8% is reasonable and beneficial for most patients with type 2 diabetes… … though if lifestyle changes can get that number lower, then go for it.

What does A1C tell the clinician?

The A1C test is a blood test that provides information about your average levels of blood glucose, also called blood sugar, over the past 3 months. The A1C test can be used to diagnose type 2 diabetes and prediabetes. The A1C test is also the primary test used for diabetes management.

How should you store your Jardiance medication?

Store at room temperature away from light and moisture. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep all medications away from children and pets. Do not flush medications down the toilet or pour them into a drain unless instructed to do so.

What is diabetes with microalbuminuria?

[6,7] Microalbuminuria is the strong predictor of diabetic nephropathy, which is the main cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with diabetes mellitus. Microalbuminuria is also characterized by increased prevalence of arterial hypertension, proliferative retinopathy, and peripheral neuropathy.

How do you educate diabetes?

Education and Support

  1. Make better decisions about your diabetes.
  2. Work with your health care team to get the support you need.
  3. Understand how to take care of yourself and learn the skills to: Eat healthy. Be active. Check your blood sugar (glucose). Take your medicine. Solve problems.
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What are therapeutic procedures for diabetes?

This includes monitoring blood glucose levels, dietary management, maintaining physical activity, keeping weight and stress under control, monitoring oral medications and, if required, insulin use via injections or pump.

What can diabetics do to educate patients?

Adopt healthy eating habits through nutrition education, including meal-planning, weight-loss strategies and other disease-specific nutrition counseling. Develop problem-solving strategies and skills to self-manage diabetes. Monitor blood glucose and learn how to interpret and appropriately respond to the results.

What is the first line treatment for diabetes?

Metformin should be the first-line drug for managing type 2 diabetes. Insulin and sulfonylureas should be second line, and glitazones should be reserved for third line. Metformin is the only drug for type 2 diabetes that does not cause weight gain, which is an important advantage.

What is normal blood sugar level?

A blood sugar level less than 140 mg/dL (7.8 mmol/L) is normal. A reading of more than 200 mg/dL (11.1 mmol/L) after two hours indicates diabetes. A reading between 140 and 199 mg/dL (7.8 mmol/L and 11.0 mmol/L) indicates prediabetes.

What is a normal blood sugar level immediately after eating?

Here are the normal blood sugar ranges for a person without diabetes according to the American Diabetes Association: Fasting blood sugar (in the morning, before eating): under 100 mg/dL. 1 hour after a meal: 90 to 130 mg/dL. 2 hours after a meal: 90 to 110 mg/dL.