Can toenails fall off from diabetes?

Why do diabetics lose their toenails?

Changes in the diabetic toenails are usually due to: Poor circulation. Trauma – which often goes unnoticed due to neuropathy. General susceptibility to fungal infections – resulting from high levels of glucose in the blood.

Can a diabetics toes fall off?

The most common amputations in people with diabetes are the toes, feet, and lower legs.

How do you treat diabetic toenails?

If there is nail thickening, brittleness, separation and inflammation, an oral (pill) antifungal agent can be effective as a single therapy or in combination with an antifungal lacquer. The usual discoloration of the toenail is a yellowish brown hue.

What serious illness causes toenails to fall off?

You have a nail fungus

A nail fungal infection, known as onychomycosis, is one of the most common reasons that toenails detach from the nail bed and fall off.

What are signs of diabetic feet?

Signs of Diabetic Foot Problems

  • Changes in skin color.
  • Changes in skin temperature.
  • Swelling in the foot or ankle.
  • Pain in the legs.
  • Open sores on the feet that are slow to heal or are draining.
  • Ingrown toenails or toenails infected with fungus.
  • Corns or calluses.
  • Dry cracks in the skin, especially around the heel.
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What is a diabetic foot?

Foot problems are common in people with diabetes. They can happen over time when high blood sugar damages the nerves and blood vessels in the feet. The nerve damage, called diabetic neuropathy, can cause numbness, tingling, pain, or a loss of feeling in your feet.

Why am I losing my toenails?

It’s usually caused by an injury, fungal infection, or psoriasis. However, chemicals, certain medications, and serious illness can also make your toenail fall off. Once your toenail falls off, it can’t reattach itself and keep growing. You’ll need to wait for the new nail to grow back in its place.

How long do diabetics live after toe amputation?

In one study, research showed that following an amputation, up to 50% of people with diabetes will die within 2 years.

Can diabetes affect nails?

People with diabetes are vulnerable to infections in and around the nails, including Gram-negative bacteria or fungi. Neuropathy and glycaemia increase the risk, as does damage to the nail or adjacent skin, for example by distorted or sharp-edged nails. It is vital to have good nail care in both hands and feet.

Why do diabetics get thick toenails?

Diabetics often have reduced blood flow to their feet, which may cause thicker toenails or numbness. With psoriasis, the nail may lift away from the toe. Make sure you take good care of yourself to avoid complications of either diabetes or psoriasis.

What is the white stuff under my toenails?

Nail psoriasis sometimes causes too much keratin to grow under the nail. This overgrowth is called subungual hyperkeratosis. People with hyperkeratosis may notice a white, chalky substance under the nail. When this occurs in the toenails, the pressure of shoes pushing down on the nails might cause pain.

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Should I be worried if my toenail falls off?

Detached toenails are usually safe to remove, and they will typically grow back within a year and a half. A detached toenail can result from an injury or infection. Fungal infections or injuries may require additional medical attention to help ensure the toenail grows back properly.

Should I go to the doctor if my toenail is falling off?

If you aren’t comfortable tending to the nail yourself or think the damage is serious, call your doctor or a podiatrist. Go to an urgent care center or emergency room when: The tear is too far down for you to trim. The base or sides of the nail are pulling away or already detached from the nail bed or nail folds.

What medication causes toenails to fall off?

Drugs that can cause onycholysis and photo-onycholysis include:

  • Psoralens (photochemotherapy or PUVA)
  • Doxycycline.
  • Thiazide diuretics.
  • Oral contraceptives.
  • Fluoroquinolone antibiotics.
  • Taxanes.
  • Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)
  • Captopril.